3min reads

What you need to know about thyroid cancer screening – cancergo3

3min reads

What you need to know about thyroid cancer screening – cancergo3

admin
admin

What is Thyroid Cancer?

The thyroid is a gland in the front of the neck responsible for hormone production. When cells of the thyroid become abnormal, cancer develops. There are no screening tests to evaluate thyroid cancer cells’ presence. A diagnosis is typically made when someone is being evaluated for the cause of symptoms they may be experiencing.

Risk factors for thyroid cancer

  • Family history of thyroid cancer
  • History of radiation exposure
  • Being overweight or obese
  • Diet too high or low in iodine
  • Inherited syndromes such as multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN), familial adenomatous polyposis, and Cowden disease
  • White or Asian race
  • Ages 20 to 55 years old
  • Female sex

Numercial list

  1. Family history of thyroid cancer
  2. History of radiation exposure
  3. Being overweight or obese
  4. Diet too high or low in iodine

One of these tests is an ultrasound, where sound waves are used to get a picture of the thyroid gland. It will be looking for nodules that look suspicious for cancer.

Tests for thyroid cancer

If thyroid cancer is suspected, there can be a variety of tests that can be done.
 
One of these tests is an ultrasound, where sound waves are used to get a picture of the thyroid gland. It will be looking for nodules that look suspicious for cancer. Ultrasound can also look at lymph nodes near the thyroid to see if they also look suspicious for cancer. Ultrasound is often used to assist during a biopsy, where a needle is inserted into a nodule to test for cancer cells.
 
An MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) can also be done to get a detailed look at the thyroid. It is often done if ultrasound images are inconclusive.
A radioiodine thyroid scan is a test that can be done after thyroid cancer has been diagnosed. During this test, a pill containing radioactive iodine is swallowed. The iodine is taken up by the thyroid and other thyroid cancer cells in the body. Images are then taken to see if there are thyroid cancer cells outside the thyroid.
 
In conclusion, thyroid cancer screening is essential to detect the disease early. The American Thyroid Association recommends that people at high risk for thyroid cancer should get screened annually.
Image with description

What is Thyroid Cancer?

The thyroid is a gland in the front of the neck responsible for hormone production. When cells of the thyroid become abnormal, cancer develops. There are no screening tests to evaluate thyroid cancer cells’ presence. A diagnosis is typically made when someone is being evaluated for the cause of symptoms they may be experiencing.
admin
admin

Download our
mobile app

Share this post
You may also like
Articles
What is mantle cell lymphoma?
December 22, 2022

Mantle cell lymphoma is a type of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma cancer that grows in the lymphatic system. The lymphatic system is responsible for moving fluids around the body and transporting the immune system. Mantle cell lymphoma is not common and is responsible for less than 10% of lymphoma diagnoses. It’s most…

Julie Scott, DNP

author

Articles
The basics of Cutaneous T cell lymphoma: what it is and how it affects people
December 22, 2022

Cutaneous T cell lymphoma (CTCL) is a type of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, cancer that grows in the lymphatic system. More specifically, CTCL grows in the T cells, a type of white blood cell that helps to fight infection. With CTCL, these T-cells become cancerous and cause the skin to develop lesions.…

Julie Scott, DNP

author

Articles
Colorectal cancer
November 8, 2022

What is Colorectal cancer? Colorectal cancer also referred to as CRC, is cancer that starts somewhere inside the colon or rectum of the digestive system. It is the third most common cancer in the United States for both men and women, and although rates of CRC overall have been decreasing,…

Julie Scott, DNP

author

cancerGO gives you access to a community

Where are people to listen, answer questions, share information, and offer valuable and timely advice